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Feeling Ostomistic
Thursday, February 04 2016

NB: Some images of my stoma and ulcer might be confronting, proceed with caution view at your own risk

For the past month I have been dealing with a new challenge in relation to my stoma.... not that changing my stoma bag isn't enough of a challenge but I have had to deal with an ulcer that had formed mere centimetres from my stoma and required a lot of attention.

I was in hospital early January (the day after New Years) with an infected portacath, and I did a bag change before I went off to surgery and there was this giant ulcer which just more or less appeared near my stoma.

Boy was it sore!

It was fairly deep and over the first week or two was painful to touch but thankfully 5 weeks later, the ulcer has almost fully healed.

But it was certainly confronting and I learnt some new techniques and products (which have become a lifesaver).

I also owe a lot of thanks to my stoma nurse, without her advice and knowledge I would not have known what to do, and luckily she has had plenty of experiences with ulcers near stomas and knew what to do.

I don't want you to feel alarmed or worried that you too will get an ulcer, mine just happened to be caused from a necrotic tumour that is dying and causing an infection under my skin, and that infection was trying to break out to the surface and the pressure formed an ulcer. I hope you aren't unlucky and don't endure this, but hopefully I can share my experience and tips that might help you too.

Some of the products I recently learnt how to use and some application tips:

#1 - Prontosan
This was introduced by my stoma nurse and she gave me a bottle of prontosan to use for when she came to my house for a home visit and stoma bag and wound care change. It is a solution that is great for wound irrigation and has an anti-bacterial property that helps your wounds to heal. It doesn't sting either.

Application: We soaked some cloth in the solution and then placed the saturated cloth over the wound for around 5 minutes, letting it soak in

#2 - Kaltostat
This is a wound dressing that is known for helping to inhibit heamostasis (the body's process to stop bleeding).

Application: A small piece was cut to the size of the ulcer, initially there were two pieces layered on top of one another then as the wound began healing only one piece/layer of dressing was required.

#3 - Coloplast stoma paste
I haven't used stoma paste before, but as we really needed to ensure there was protection of the wound from my stoma output the paste was used to form an added barrier.

Application: Squeeze out some of the paste over the dressing so that it is a line going over it. Using a cotton bud that has been wet, spread the paste out so that it covers the Kaltostat and has formed an extra barrier. It is best to wet the cotton bud to prevent the paste sticking to it and helps the spread of the paste easier.

#4 - Eakin Cohesive seals
I hadn't used these seals until recently, and I love that the seals are big and round and provide a lot of added protection to your stoma and the skin around your stoma.

Application: With these seals you can stretch out the inner circle (looks like a donut) to the size of your stoma. You simply place it over your stoma and press down so that it adheres to your skin. I found this helped to provide an added barrier between my stoma and my wound. You can also cut a line and then wrap the cohesive seal around your stoma and cut a piece from a new cohesive seal if you don't want to stretch it out and want it to be more sturdier.

-----> Now I applied my stoma bag and secured it with the elastic tape seals and now I was ready to face the world

If you're in Australia, these products (minus the prontosan and kaltostat) can be ordered through your ostomy association if you need some assistance be sure to ask your stoma nurse.

I highly suggest if you do get an ulcer or experience skin breakdown near your stoma that you seek the help and advice from your nurse or doctors. My blog is merely a sharing of my experience and tips and I am not a healthcare professional.

Images:

    
Left: stoma and ulcer first day it was discovered approx 2cm. Right: Two days after it was discovered approx 3cm

 
Left: week 4 slowly healing over. Right: it is almost all healed (week 5)

Posted by: Talya AT 11:17 pm   |  Permalink   |  0 Comments  |  Email
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~  Living with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis - Effects of FAP  ~

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Talya Goding - Feeling Ostomistic   talya@feelingostomistic.com.au  |  0447 426 860

Thank you for stopping by Feeling Ostomistic. It has taken a lot of courage to share my story and I ask that you show me and my site/blog respect and courtesy. Views expressed in this blog are my own and I am not a nurse or a doctor. If you need medical advice please seek your medical practitioner.

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