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Feeling Ostomistic
Tuesday, June 30 2015

NB: THIS IS A SPONSORED GUEST POST

In life, we all have our regrets and in hindsight wished we could go back in time and with the knowledge that we know now and not repeat the same mistakes again. I have many of these moments where I wished I did things differently or better and one of them was going to see a financial planner when I was 18 or 19 and something that was in place before I was married.

You see, not long after my wedding my dad broke the news that he was terminal with bowel cancer and that his type was caused by a rare disease called Familial Adenamatous Polyposis (FAP), which was caused from a mutation of the APC gene (a tumour supressor gene) and that it was also genetic. I underwent tests and was confirmed that I too had this disease, and as I was a newlywed I decided to apply for life insurance and was rejected on the grounds of the condition and as it is something that I have seen numerous insurers about and none can find an insurer willing to insure me as I am at high risk of cancer and more than likely will die earlier than healthy/normal peers my age.

Then I got sick in 2012 with severe endometriosis and required surgery to remove a 15cm round mass off of my ovary along with the lining of said ovary and removing/excising hundreds of sites of endometriosis. My surgeon said it was one of the most severe cases he had seen and especially in someone who was only 21. Because of the extent of the damage I was placed in a medically induced menopause which was truly horible. It made me so sick I was unable to work as I had these insufferable migrains and the nausea and hot flashes were cruel.

The week I stopped working was the week I was told that my bowel was turning cancerous and needed to have my bowel removed. So either way I would have been forced to stop working as I was told I needed 12 months off of work to recover, and then I was diagnosed with pancreatitis in 2013 which meant every other week I was in hospital for 7-10 days undergoing treatment for that, and then the desmoid tumours were diagnosed along with the thyroid cancer this year has meant that I haven't been able to return to the workforce as I am just not well enough to be considered reliable for work.

I can tell you the last 3 years have been hard financially, emotionally and physically and one thing I wished I had in place was life insurance to help me financially while I can't work, and money has been so tight and often stressful. I am just thankful my husband can work so hard to provide for us and support me while I am unable to work.

I really wished I had some sort of security in place, and it is something I hope through my mistake you will consider.

So I asked our friends over at Life Insurance Comparison to help explain how life insurance can be used while you're alive and become ill or disabled, and Sally has written a great guest post for us on this topic.

How Life Insurance Can Help If You Become Ill or Disabled

Wondering how you'll pay the bills if the main earner in the household gets ill, has an accident or dies can be a hugely stressful experience that can be avoided through life insurance. At Life Insurance Comparison, we're here to help you to navigate the often confusing world of life insurance so that you can get the right protection for your needs. We'll work with you to buy the right amount of cover and the most appropriate type of product to support your family if the worst happens. 

When you first think about life insurance, what comes to mind? If your initial thought was to with death, you may be unaware of the full benefits of life insurance. Many people mistakenly believe that life insurance only comes into its own if the policyholder dies but it can actually be an invaluable form of financial support if you become seriously ill or disabled and cannot work as a result. None of us want to think about the idea that we might be unlucky enough to experience this but it pays to be prepared.

In this post, we look at the ways in which life insurance can offer peace of mind if illness or disability occurs during the lifetime of the policy.

Life Insurance and Illness

If you become ill and are unable to work because of this, the subsequent stress could make your situation worse. Even if your lack of income is only a short term proposition, you could be under severe pressure to make ends meet if you don’t have savings to fall back on to tide you over. Fortunately, life insurance can provide an income to ease financial stress.

The exact nature of this income depends on the type of life insurance product that you buy. Income Protection Insurance will provide regular monthly payments that can be anything up to 75 per cent of your usual salary, which can be used for day-to-day living expenses while you are not working due to illness or an accident, while Trauma Insurance offers a lump sum payment if you are diagnosed with one of the medical conditions that are covered by the policy.

You’ll therefore need to think carefully about the kind of life insurance protection that you would want to have in place if you were to become seriously ill or disabled. Would you prefer to have a regular income stream coming in each month that can be used regardless of the situation? Or would you rather receive a lump sum payment if you diagnosed with a serious and traumatic condition such as cancer, a heart attack or stroke?

Life Insurance and Disability

Life insurance can also help if you become disabled and cannot work. In particular, Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) cover provides a lump sum payment if you become permanently disabled and this stops you being able to work. This type of life insurance cover is usually needed if a professional has confirmed that you will never be able to work again due to a new (and not pre-existing) disability. 

How Much Life Insurance to Buy?

Underinsurance is a huge problem in Australia in general, and this is definitely true for life insurance. This is because many of the Australians who do have life insurance don’t have enough cover to provide full peace of mind if the worst were to happen. You may already have some degree of life insurance through your superannuation fund but this is usually extremely basic and does not offer much protection at all. To be safe, you’ll need to have additional life insurance cover in place to fully meet your needs so that you are not caught out financially if you need to rely on the income.

With Income Protection Insurance, you’ll want to safeguard as much of your salary as you can afford (up to 75 per cent of it) so that you can still experience a good standard of living while you cannot work.

With Trauma or TPD cover, you’ll need to make sure that your lump sum payment is substantial enough to cover everything that you would want. You’ll therefore need to think about how much you would realistically need for regular outgoings and also factor in medical and rehabilitation expenses (if you don’t have health insurance that would cover some or all of these latter costs). Trauma insurance is generally the most expensive type of life insurance but it can turn out to be the most cost effective if you need to call on it.

Ideally, you should look to buy as much life insurance as you can realistically afford so that you are less likely to be underinsured. If you want the lump sum payment to be able to act as a long term source of income, this will obviously be more expensive to buy but would be very useful if you are unable work for over a year due to serious illness, an accident or temporary disability.

Thank you Sally and Life Insurance Comparison for explaining how beneficial it can be to have Life Insurance while you're alive! If you found this post helpful (or any on my blog) please feel free to leave a comment below.

 
Posted by: Talya AT 04:20 am   |  Permalink   |  1 Comment  |  Email
Saturday, June 13 2015

NB: This is a sponsored post

Lately, I have been thinking so much about how differently life as an adult actually is when compared to what I thought it would be like as a teenager. Oh how naive was my younger self.

There are things I never thought were important or necessary until the time came and I realised it was too late.

Here are my 5 things I believe that every adult should have in place:

#1 Life Insurance Policy
Growing up, I always thought that a life insurance policy was something that was only necessary when you had died to help you pay for your debts or your funeral or to help your support your loved ones.

I didn't realise that having a life insurance policy can actually be of help if you get sick and need time off work, or if you suffer an illness or injury and become disabled or unable to work again, the life insurance policy can help you out.

What I wished was that someone had of said to me when I turned 18 to get insurance, as it wasn't until I got sick that I went to take out a policy and told that I am now 'unsurable'. There were so many times that I wished I had that extra financial assistance when I was too sick to work.

I did however make sure that once I was married that my husband has the necessary cover in the event that he becomes sick. We met with our financial planner at our bank and set up the policy to be paid out of his super fund. It is convenient for us paying it this way, as I am often in hospital sick it is one less bill to remember to pay. We were able to nominate the total insured amount we wanted as well.

#2 A will
I know a will isn't something that a young person often thinks about taking out, or a common misconception is that "I have nothing to leave in my will, so having one is pointless". A will is more than a document that states who will receive your car or the balance of your bank account, it is also a document that can leave instructions for your afterlife such as whether or not you consent to your body being used in organ donation, or where you wish to be buried or if you are to be cremated.

A will also has instructions over who is responsible for your digital assets such as a blog, facebook etc and what you're wanting done with these digital assets when you die. My husband understands my clear instructions of what I want to be done with my blog etc when I die, he knows that I want to keep my blog open as a resource for all the young people in the future who have FAP or will be needing a stoma and are looking for support when they feel alone.

My husband and I were struggling to find a time that suited both of us to visit a lawyer, so we were so happy when we came across Nest Legal an online legal firm, not only did it mean that we could organise our wills from the comfort of our own home, but also meant working around a schedule that suited us and not around when both my husband and I could make it. It was a very convenient solution, and so lovely to deal with.

#3 Enduring Power of Attorney
It is a false reality that only 'old people' need an enduring power of attorney in place. The sad reality is that we have no control over what misfortunes or illnesses may come in the future, and it is important that we have things in place to not only help yourself but to help those around you to understand your wishes.

An enduring power of attorney is a document that is as important as your will, and is a document that nominates someone to act on your behalf for financial, legal and health matters if you become incapacitated or unable to make decisions for yourself.

It is important that you discuss with your loved ones whom you wish to appoint and what roles you expect of them. It is important to choose someone there won't be conflicts of interest with or someone who can remain impartial to decisions and can act with your best interests in mind.

To learn more about the different roles and responsibilities of a power of attorney, the NSW Trustee's and guardians has some great info.

#4 A Regular GP
Up until 2011, I didn't have a regular GP. It was more of a 'what ever doctor can bulk bill and is available' sort of situations I was finding myself in. Tell you what, it was rather an inconvenience... You would see a doctor and tell them all the issues you've been having lately and your past medical history then he would come up with a diagnosis and then the next time I needed to see a doctor it was starting the process all over again. It wasn't just wasting my time, it was also wasting the doctors time.

As my medical history was becoming more and more indepth with each visit, I made the decision to 'shop around' for the right GP and I happened to have found him 4 years ago and never looked back. It is really helpful now having 1 GP who receives all the correspondence from doctors, scans and blood tests rather than having a few doctors and not remembering which GP you saw for what issue.

Trust me, having a regular GP will make life easier!

#5 Health insurance or Ambulance cover
I know I have mentioned before how beneficial it is to have health insurance (read my 12 reasons why here) but it is also important to at least have an ambulance cover in place. A trip to the hospital in an ambulance can very quickly become an expensive excursion, I have received bills for $800+ just to go to the other side of town! Luckily, I had cover in place.

You never know when you or your family might need an ambulance and there is nothing more stressful when you're dealing with an emergency than worrying about how you'll be paying for it, instead focusing your energy where it is needed.

If it is health Insurance cover you need, speak to the guys over at Health Insurance Comparison to find out what policies there are to match your needs or lifestyle.

I have no idea why I was in such a hurry to become an Adult, some days being a kid sounds so much easier.

So while these might be my list of 5 things I believe every adult should have in place, I know that you might have other suggestions. Feel free to leave your suggestions in the comments below, it might be of value to another reader who hadn't thought of it.

DISCLAIMER: While this post was written by myself about my experiences and the 5 things I believe every adult should have in place, all views expressed in this article are mine. This post was written for Health Insurance Comparison.

 

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Posted by: Talya AT 10:45 am   |  Permalink   |  1 Comment  |  Email
Saturday, June 13 2015

There are some things in life that people shouldn't have to endure, but thankfully there are organisations out there to lend a much needed helping hand when you need it.

When I received my Cancer diagnosis earlier this year, Redkite were there for me and without their support I am certain my journey would have been completely different.

Redkite were there for me when I was alone in hospital for over a month in Sydney, 800km south of home.

Before I was referred to Redkite by the hospital social worker, I had seen Redkite on tv but never actually knew what it was that they did or how they helped others. Little did I realise that they were an amazing organisation helping young people aged 0-24 with Cancer and their families.

Here are 5 ways RedKite helped to make a difference:

#1 Red Duffle bag filled with goodies called a support pack
I remember when I was in hospital and got my diagnosis I was pretty devastated to say the least. I was anxious about what the future had in store for me, and I felt so lonely as my husband and family were 800km away.

When my youth support worker from the RPA Youth Team came in carrying this huge Redkite duffle overnight bag, I thought it was the coolest gift. Inside the bag was some amazing essentials that made the biggest difference to my hospital stay, and also since coming home.

There was:

  • a toiletry bag filled with toothbrushes and toothpaste and toiletries;
  • this super snuggly redkite blanket I take with me everywhere;
  • redkite travel coffee mug;
  • redkite drink bottle;
  • $50 coles gift card;
  • magazines;
  • visual arts diary with coloured pencils;
  • and there was so much more!

I take the blanket with me everywhere I go and snuggle up with it everyday, it is so soft and warm. I also use the bag heaps as well, often accompanies me to hospital.

#2 Financial assistance in the form of Coles or petrol gift cards
With all the travelling to and from Sydney this year, these petrol vouchers have made the biggest difference between whether or not I made it to the appointments. Let's just say things have been super tight this year with so much being spent on medical expenses (doctors, pathology, medications, radiology, hospital excess, surgery costs etc). The coles vouchers have made a huge difference too and has meant being able to buy groceries.

I am so appreciative that there is the support there when times are tough to help you manage financially.

#3 Education scholarships
If you're a young person with cancer and you're also studying or still in school, Redkite have education grants for up to $1000 that can help you with things like tutoring costs, course fees, stationery, or equipment.

These education grants can be a huge help if you're studying and help you to achieve your goals or ambitions. For more information click here.

#4 Dare to dream scholarships
These are national annual scholarships open to 15-24 year olds who've had cancer. The scholarships require you to enter a creative entry based on what your dream is and how having cancer has gotten in the way and how the scholarship can help you to make your dreams happen.

Applications close on the 13th of July. For more information visit here!

#5 counselling and help
One thing I have learnt from my cancer journey is just how lonely and distant you can become from those close to you, cancer can also be really isolating as well. There were times where speaking to Redkite really helped me to cope and learn new coping skills, but to also just have someone to talk to that isn't directly involved. It was hard talking to my family or husband about how I was feeling as I didn't want to burden them with my feelings and thoughts, so it was good talking to someone who understood.

Redkite can be contacted via 1800 REDKITE (1800 733 548), Monday to Friday, 9am – 7pm AEST or support@redkite.org.au.

Did you also know that they offer help and support to help you return to studies or the workforce? They can offer an individualised plan for 15-24 years who've had cancer and are wanting to return to studies or work. They work with you through setting a range of goals and a realistic plan to help you achieve them.

I would like to say a huge thank you to Redkite and for everyone reading this who donates and supports them. Their work that they do to help support young people like me who have had cancer is so important and has made the world of difference to my life. I will always be grateful for the support and help. 

Disclaimer: I wanted to write about my experiences with Redkite not because I was asked to or felt obliged to, but because I don't know how I could have gotten through this year without their support and help. I am sharing my experiences as they have made the world of difference to my cancer journey and I know first hand how important their work is. Please donate and support them so that they can continue helping young kids with cancer and their families.

 

 
Posted by: Talya AT 02:58 am   |  Permalink   |  Email
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~  Living with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis - Effects of FAP  ~

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Talya Goding - Feeling Ostomistic   talya@feelingostomistic.com.au  |  0447 426 860

Thank you for stopping by Feeling Ostomistic. It has taken a lot of courage to share my story and I ask that you show me and my site/blog respect and courtesy. Views expressed in this blog are my own and I am not a nurse or a doctor. If you need medical advice please seek your medical practitioner.

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